Beer Companies Want To Take Business Back From Pot — Here’s How They’re Doing It
 
 

August 8, 2018

As more states and even countries begin to legalize recreational cannabis around the globe, alcohol has taken the back seat. But apparently, not for long. More and more beer companies have begun to experiment with THC-infused, non-alcoholic beer, including Molson and Province.

According to new research, adults in states that have legalized recreational marijuana are binge drinking 13% less than states that haven’t legalized its use. This means that recreational marijuana use is influencing the alcohol industry in unexpected ways.

To make up for the slump in sales, many beer companies have started entering the market for recreational marijuana. But instead of opting for a kitchen remodel that can offer an 83% return on investment, beer companies have begun to make deals with pot distributors to make up for the loss in revenue. Molson and Province are just two of the companies that have hopped on board in Canada.

“Canada is breaking new ground in the cannabis sector and, as one of the country’s leading beverage companies, Molson Coors Canada has a unique opportunity to participate in this exciting and rapidly expanding consumer segment,” said president and CEO of Molson Coors Canada, Frederic Landtmeters.

Province expects its future beer beverage to hit harder than the traditional edible, according to Esquire. Although CBD oils and THC have been used in beer before, Province has brewed its beer with stalks, stems, and buds to make a truly unique beverage with 6.5 milligrams of THC.

If you expect it to taste like a plant, you’re not wrong; initial experiments with the beverage went horribly, according to the co-founder and CEO of Province Brands. Dooma Wendschuh explained that it tasted like “rotten broccoli,” but a few tweaks to the chemistry has resulted in a pleasantly dry beer.

For jealous Americans, don’t lose hope; certain beer companies in legal states have delved into THC beverages as well. Lagunitas, owned by Heineken, has recently announced its new THC beverage. A startup in Nevada is also experimenting with cannabis-infused droughts.

Unfortunately, Canada hasn’t yet regulated edibles, but beer companies are optimistic that they’ll be able to roll out their beverages by 2019. For now, Canadian consumers will just have to make do with recreational marijuana use starting in October.